Tag Archives: Keeping Active as You Get Older

Hope Restored- Playing Golf Again

I suffered an injury playing golf in late Fall, 2017. My left extensor muscle swelled up and I couldn’t use my fingers of my left hand for even the simplest of tasks. I was in severe pain and could no longer play golf. I became severely depressed since I had just cut back on my work hours to play more golf with my friends . At age 66 I wanted to go into semi retirement to play more golf. After 53 years of working I was excited to be able to cut back and play the game I have loved for 30 years. My orthopod told me to rest it for six weeks and limit lifting to 1-3 pounds as he thought it was a torn extensor muscle. After four weeks of no improvement I asked for an MRI. The MRI showed a tendinopathy of the left elbow with degeneration of the extensor. My orthopod injected the area with Kenalog and told me to find a good hand therapist .

I had some therapy connections being an RN and contacted someone who recommended Tiffany Carpenter at Therapy solutions for my “tennis elbow”. After the assessment Tiffany explained the Astym treatment to me and her success with this technique. She explained in detail the tools and technique. After the first 5 treatments I began to see a significant difference. The swelling was rapidly subsiding and the pain was completely gone. It has been 6 weeks and I am so excited to say I will be swinging a golf club for the first time in months! Astym therapy is Awesome and my hope has been restored that I will soon be playing golf again and enjoying life! Thank you Astym therapy!

Billie Klesch-Sheeran

Treating Clinic:
Therapy Solutions
3126 Appaloosa Circle, San Angelo, Texas, 76901

15 Exercises You Can Perform at Your Desk

Desk jobs can be hard. You may get fidgety or restless, or the sedentary work might have you feeling lethargic by the time you leave for the night. It can be hard to feel motivated or accomplished. But sitting for long hours at a computer isn’t just draining; it can actually be bad for you. In addition to the risks of poor posture or sub-par chairs leading to back pain, sitting for eight hours a day can reduce your lifespan and increase your risk for certain diseases. But having a desk job doesn’t have to mean sitting all day.

Here are 15 exercises you can perform at your desk (or at least nearby) to get you active at work*.

  1. Desk Pushups– Place your hands on your desk and walk your feet backwards to put your body at a 45 degree angle. Complete a set of 10-15 pushups in this position.


  1. Shoulder Blade Squeeze– Press your shoulders back to pull your shoulder blades in as close to each other as possible, like you’re trying to hold something between them. This will also help alleviate poor posture.


  1. Office Yoga– Basic yoga positions can be accomplished in relatively open spaces, such as an office if you have your own or a break room. Simple positions are a quick form of stress relief and light exercise. This one might be a little rough in a cubicle, though. Try making arrangements with supervisors to allow for 15-minute group yoga sessions for the whole team a few times a week.


  1. Squats– You can do standard squats and complete a set of 15 in front of your desk, or you can modify the squat to use your desk chair. Lower your body in a squat position until your butt just bumps the edge of the chair, then rise back up.


  1. Wall Sits– Stand a few inches away from a wall and lower into a squat position, with your back pressed against the wall. Lower your body until your knees are bent at a 90 degree angle and hold this position for a few seconds before standing back up. Repeat.


  1. Calf Raises– Stand with your feet together and raise up your heels and calves so you’re standing on your toes. Hold this position for 10 seconds then gently lower down. Repeat. If you need the extra support, hold onto your chair back while you’re on your toes for stability.


  1. Seated Leg Lifts– Sitting on the edge of your chair, extend one leg to stick straight out and hold it out for 10 seconds. Slowly lower the leg, nearly to the floor but not quite, then lift again and hold for 10 seconds. Complete a few repetitions and then switch to the other leg.


  1. Standing Stretches– Just the simple act of standing is enough to see some health benefits during the day, but you can make this even more valuable by throwing in some quick stretches. Bend over and attempt to touch your toes. If you can’t, just go as far as is comfortable and each day try to bend just a little bit further. Standing upright bend your neck side to side slowly, trying to press your ear into our shoulder. Move your right arm across your body and use your left arm to press it into your chest, and then swap sides. Raise your arms above you, then grip your hands together and lower them behind your head. Place your legs shoulder width apart and your arms to the side, slowly rotate your body to one side, then the other. Do a couple hops and shakes to get rid of any extra stiffness.


  1. Desk dips– Place your hands on the desk behind you and walk your feet out a little bit. Lower your body down with your arms, hold for a second, then raise yourself back up. Complete 10-15 of these motions.


  1. Bicep Curls– You don’t need dumbbells when you’ve got a water bottle, a stapler, or pretty much any small object of weight that you can fit in your hand. When you’re watching a video or reading an email, use your arms to get in some simple bicep curls, holding your object in your hand and curling it in towards your shoulder.


  1. Overhead Presses– Use that handy water bottle again and this time start with your elbow bent to the side and raise up like you’re pushing the water bottle to the ceiling. Lower your arm back to a 90 degree bend and then repeat. Slow and steady is the key to feeling these exercises working.


  1. Table Press and Leg Lift– If you’ve got the space under your desk or conference table, press both hands down on the top of the desk while lifting both legs to be fully straight under the table. Hold for 10 seconds, release, then repeat.


  1. Hand Strengthening– With or without a stress ball, you can exercise your hands and help relieve pain from typing by making a fist, squeezing tightly for a few seconds, then releasing and stretch your fingers. Repeat this exercise periodically during the day to help prevent carpal tunnel pain.


  1. Toe Raises– While seated, keep your heels firmly on the ground and lift your toes. You’ll feel the stretch in your shins and calves. Repeat periodically throughout the day. A perk of this one is it can be done subtly under your desk at any time.


  1. Single Leg Romanian Deadlift– Placing your right hand on your desk for balance stand on your right leg. Slowly lower your torso and arm in front of you while raising your left leg behind you, with your right knee just slightly bent. Hold this position for a few seconds then straighten back up and switch legs.


But desk exercises aren’t the only way to counteract long hours sitting. In addition to these exercises, there are other work changes that can have great benefits for both your mental and physical health.

  • Instead of emailing your coworkers walk to their desk or office. It’ll get you walking and the face to face interaction can help humanize the work space and make a friendlier environment.
  • Take the stairs instead of the elevator if you are physically able to, and if you’re really trying to get an early workout take the steps two at a time (carefully!).
  • When you find yourself getting restless, stand up. Even without exercises, the act of standing gets your blood flowing and your mood boosted.

Making these changes in the workplace will not only be reflected in your health, but in higher energy levels at work, less lethargy when you come home, reduced stress, and an overall better mood. Remember, small changes can make a big difference!

*The content above is for informational purposes only, and before starting any exercise program, you should consult your physician or other qualified healthcare provider to make sure it is right for you and to answer any questions you may have. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

6 Tips for Aging Athletes

6 Tips For Aging Athletes

From sport to sport, the age of “peak performance” varies, but for most of us the effects of aging really sink in in the early to mid-30s. You start waking up with new aches and that morning run gets a little shorter and little slower each time. While Astym therapy can help keep your body feeling young  longer, you can’t outrun time and you shouldn’t try. So here are some tips on how to age well as an athlete.


  1. Accept your age, your body, and your limitations.
Middle aged athletic man running with group, smiling and listening to music
Tips for Athletes getting older: Accept your age, your body, and your limitations

You’re getting older, so don’t hold yourself to the standards of your younger self. You are never too old to exercise (as proven by now 91-year-old gymnast Johanna Quaas) but you should adjust your activities and goals to something reasonable for you, and only you can determine what that means.



  1. Look into low impact alternatives

    Middle aged couple cycling and smiling on open road.
    Tips for Athletes getting older: Try low impact alternatives, like cycling

Consider modifying exercises that are damaging your body. If running becomes too painful or you experience an impact injury, try cycling or swimming for a while to reduce the impact on your body. If you find certain exercises are causing you more pain than they used to, adjust the exercises to reduce soft tissue damage so you can keep active without injury. There are a number of low impact alternatives out there.


  1. Sleep More, Eat Better, Drink Water.

    Athletic woman drinks water to hydrate during run
    Tips for Athletes getting older: Drink water, eat healthy, rest enough

While these actions are important for athletes of any age, they are especially important as you age. Most healing occurs during the REM sleep cycle, so it is especially important to get that rest to allow your body to recover. Consuming water, electrolytes, carbohydrates, and protein after exercise is conducive to body hydration, restoring muscle glycogen levels, and repairing soft tissue damage.



  1. Don’t skip out on strength training.

    Mature man in red shirt lifts heavy dumbbells at a gym
    Tip for Athletes getting older- Don’t skip strength training

One of the most crippling aspects of aging for athletes is the loss of muscle mass and strength with age. Resistance training and bodyweight exercises like pushups and squats can help to maintain and build muscle mass and prevent loss of strength.




  1. Give yourself more time between workouts,
A woman engages in yoga outside on a nice day
Tips for athletes getting older: Give yourself enough time to rest with active recovery or break days

Especially if you push yourself to do the high intensity training of your younger years, you need to take longer rest periods in between. Even though you may be able to accomplish those workouts, it’s better to give yourself a little extra time between them for your body to recover. Rest or active recovery are both options in between high intensity training.



  1. Listen to your body when it hurts.
A woman receives physical therapy on his left knee.
Tips for Athletes getting older- Listen to your body and seek medical care when it’s necessary. Physical therapy is a great option for older athletes.

Reduce workout intensity, take additional time to rest, or seek out medical care when necessary. Physical therapy and especially Astym Therapy can help keep you healthy and help you exercise better, longer.





Age does provide you some advantages. In your years, you’ve gained knowledge and experience. Over time, you’ve come to know your body better than anyone else and what works best for you. You can feel when you’ve accomplished a good workout, even if that workout didn’t beat your personal records. And as long as you feel like you’ve accomplished something in your body, you’re moving toward your goals.