IT Band Syndrome: The Solution to a Difficult Problem

Meet today’s Guest Blogger:

 Suzie Freeman, MPT, OCS  physical therapist

Suzie Freeman, MPT, OCS
Suzie works as a Senior Physical Therapist at California Rehabilitation and Sports Physical Therapy in Huntington Beach, California. She earned her Bachelor’s Degree in Kinesiology from the University of California, Los Angeles, and then moved on to the University of Southern California for her Masters in Physical Therapy.  Suzie is the Center Coordinator for Clinical Education, as well as a Clinical Instructor, taking physical therapy students from local universities on a year-round basis. 

So, it’s the New Year, and you have taken up running, or recently increased your mileage.  Things are going great.  Your pants are looser, and you feel on top of the world.  Then, the side of your thigh or the outside of your knee starts hurting.  You have developed IT Band pain. You check the internet, and it is filled with stories of how stubborn IT Band pain is to treat, and how long it takes to recover; that is, if people recover at all.  Things seem pretty dismal.  You pop a few ibuprofens, try some ice, buy some new running shoes… but the IT Band pain just won’t go away.  You see your doctor, try some physical therapy; perhaps orthotics.  Still not better.  You wonder, “Is this the best the medical community can do for me?” Continue reading IT Band Syndrome: The Solution to a Difficult Problem

IT Band Syndrome: The Solution to a Difficult Problem

Meet today’s Guest Blogger:

Suzie Freeman, MPT, OCS physical therapist

Suzie Freeman, MPT, OCS
Suzie works as a Senior Physical Therapist at California Rehabilitation and Sports Physical Therapy in Huntington Beach, California. She earned her Bachelor’s Degree in Kinesiology from the University of California, Los Angeles, and then moved on to the University of Southern California for her Masters in Physical Therapy.  Suzie is the Center Coordinator for Clinical Education, as well as a Clinical Instructor, taking physical therapy students from local universities on a year-round basis. 

So, it’s the New Year, and you have taken up running, or recently increased your mileage.  Things are going great.  Your pants are looser, and you feel on top of the world.  Then, the side of your thigh or the outside of your knee starts hurting.  You have developed IT Band pain. You check the internet, and it is filled with stories of how stubborn IT Band pain is to treat, and how long it takes to recover; that is, if people recover at all.  Things seem pretty dismal.  You pop a few ibuprofens, try some ice, buy some new running shoesbut the IT Band pain just won’t go away.  You see your doctor, try some physical therapy; perhaps orthotics.  Still not better.  You wonder, “Is this the best the medical community can do for me?” Continue reading IT Band Syndrome: The Solution to a Difficult Problem

Tendonitis/Tendinosis: How Do You Get Better?

You need to first determine the underlying cause of your tendon pain.  Is your tendonitis (also called tendinitis) caused by inflammation?  If so, then it is the kind of tendinopathy that the healthcare system is best at resolving in short order.  The traditional treatments for inflammatory tendonitis are rest (which can include bracing), ice, and anti-inflammatory medicines, such as ibuprofen.  Once these treatments are applied, inflammatory tendonitis should resolve within 6 weeks. Continue reading Tendonitis/Tendinosis: How Do You Get Better?

Plantar Fasciitis, Achilles Tendonitis: A Patient Talks About a Treatment That Works.

Few things are more frustrating than having chronic plantar fasciitis and Achilles tendonitis (also spelled Achilles tendinitis).  Here is the story of one patient who suffered from Achilles tendon pain and plantar fasciitis, and tried multiple treatments before she finally got better with Astym at KORT physical therapy.

Lori Childs talks about Astym therapy at KORT

As an Achilles tendonitis treatment, Astym improves 94.7% of Achilles tendinitis (tendonitis), or Achilles tendinopathy cases.  Astym also resolves plantar fasciitis well, with 91.9% of plantar fasciitis or plantar fasciopathy cases improving after Astym treatment.   Chronic tendonitis can affect many areas of the body.  To view the resolution rates (outcomes) of Astym on particular types of chronic tendonitis/tendinosis, click here:  http://astym.com/upload/pdf/Astym%20Outcome%20Reports.pdf

Plantar Fasciitis: The Three Best, Most Effective Stretches for Athletes. Inside Tips From a Sports Medicine MD.

Plantar fasciitis causes a great deal of heel pain and disability among athletes.  As a sports medicine doctor, I have seen thousands of athletes sidelined by plantar fasciitis.  Most patients who receive Astym therapy respond favorably, and their plantar fasciitis resolves.  To find out if Astym therapy is right for you, please locate a provider near you, and schedule an appointment to be evaluated.

However, there are some athletes who struggle with relapse or their condition becomes chronic, or long term.  Some sports physicians and medical researchers suspect that a portion of these recalcitrant patients are not stretching properly, and that may be a factor in their failure to recover from plantar fasciitis.

Here are some stretches that may help you recover from plantar fasciitis:

Best plantar fasciitis stretch

Stretch #1:  Gastroc  Stretch: foot flat on the floor, knee straight, lean forward with your other foot extended in front of you, but keep most of your weight on your back foot until you comfortably feel the stretch in the back of your calf (gastroc muscle and Achilles tendon).

Stretch #2:  Soleus Stretch:  foot flat on the floor, KNEE BENT, lean forward on the other foot that is extended in front of you, but keep most of your weight on your back foot until you comfortably feel the stretch in the back of your calf (by bending your knee, you relax the gastroc muscle, which allows you to focus the stretch on the soleus muscle and the Achilles tendon).

Best plantar fasciitis stretch

Best Plantar Fasciitis StretchStretch #3:  Flexor Hallicus Longus (FHL) Stretch:  Often, plantar fasciitis sufferers will do some version of stretches #1 and #2 above, but fail to do this last stretch.  This stretch can often be the key in helping patients recover from plantar fasciitis.  Use a stair step or a wall to aid you in this stretch.  Stretch your toes up vertically using the wall or stair step and, keeping your heel on the floor, bend you knee slightly and push foward gently, until you comfortably feel the stretch in the bottom of your foot, the inside part of your ankle, and up the back of your calf.

As with any rehabilitation method, you should talk with your doctor prior to doing any stretching activity or other type of treatment.  In the cases of chronic plantar fasciitis,  experienced sports doctors often recommend that these stretches be done 2 times a day, with each stretch performed 3 times per session, and held for 40-60 seconds if a patient’s condition comfortably allows for this.

Botox® for Tennis Elbow?

Sounds strange to some people, but these injections are being tried to relieve tennis elbow pain, and with some success.  As a sports physician, I have seen many patients with tennis elbow.  I also do medical research, and as a result, I was invited to perform a review of a proposed article for a professional journal on botulinum toxin (Botox® is a trade name for botulinum toxin A) in the treatment of tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis).  Continue reading Botox® for Tennis Elbow?

Research on Astym: Summary of Astym Treatment’s Evidence Base

At its core, Astym treatment was developed from solid basic science research to stimulate regeneration at a cellular level.  Following that, there were a number of case studies published and then a randomized controlled clinical trial on patellar tendinopathy.  A large randomized controlled clinical trial on lateral epicondylosis was awarded a platform presentation at the American Society for Surgery of the Hand’s national meeting, and is now being submitted for publication Continue reading Research on Astym: Summary of Astym Treatment’s Evidence Base

Achilles Tendinosis in Elite Runners

Meet today’s guest blogger:

Stephanie Penny, PT, DPT

Stephanie practices at Lakeshore Sports Physical Therapy in Chicago, Illinois. She earned her Doctor of Physical Therapy degree from Central Michigan University in 2008. She has a special interest in sports medicine and vestibular rehabilitation, has completed coursework in manual therapy, and is a certified Astym® provider. Stephanie is an active member of the American Physical Therapy Association.

Elite runners alternate between intensive physical training and recovery to improve performance.  However, many runners fail to maintain a balance between intensity of training and appropriate recovery, resulting in a breakdown of tissue reparative mechanisms which eventually leads to overuse injuries.  Historically, these injuries have been referred to as “tendinitis” or “tendonitis”, words that point to inflammation as the cause of the problem.  Continue reading Achilles Tendinosis in Elite Runners

Rib pain: The buck can stop here.

Meet today’s guest blogger:

Gus Gutierrez, PT, OCS, FAAOMPT
Gus is an owner of and serves as clinical director of BRPT-Lake, a multi-clinic private practice that specializes in the treatment of orthopedic patients and sports-related injuries. He received his Orthopedic Certified Specialization distinction in 1994 and then again in 2004. He is certified as a Level 2 Manual Therapist and is Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapists. He has over 23 years of clinical experience and working with athletes on all levels. Gus has been certified in Astym since 2001.  He is also certified in Kinesiology Taping and as an Active Release Technique practitioner for the upper extremity, lower extremity and spine.

Often times patients who develop rib pain with no known etiology (cause) are processed through the medical system undergoing countless medical diagnostic tests and consultations.  Physical therapy needs to be part of the assessment team to determine whether treatment for soft tissue and joint restrictions can be helpful.  Often time these patients respond very quickly to manual therapy techniques including joint manipulation, mobilizations and Astym for the intercostal soft tissues. Continue reading Rib pain: The buck can stop here.

What is De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis?

Meet today’s guest blogger:

Kristy Uddin, OTR/L, Astym Provider
Integrated Rehabilitation Group, Inc.
Locations throughout the greater Puget Sound, Washington area
Pacific Avenue Hand Therapy – (425)374-2846
Snohomish Physical Therapy – (360)568-7774

Two of the main tendons to the thumb pass through a tunnel (or series of pulleys) located on the thumb side of the wrist. Tendons are rope-like structures that attach muscle to bone. Tendons are covered by a slippery thin soft-tissue layer, called synovium. This layer allows the tendons to slide easily through the tunnel. Any swelling of the tendons located near these nerves can put pressure on the nerves. This can cause wrist pain or numbness in the fingers.

Continue reading What is De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis?

Restore – Revitalize – Recover