Ankle Pain Relief From Astym Therapy

I had very complicated ankle surgery on May 10, 2018, and for the next four months dealt with swelling on each side, right under the ankle bones and super tender nerves that made me feel like anything that touched my foot was sandpaper. By the end of my work day, my ankles looked like really full chipmunk cheeks. It was so painful that walking was torture and I would spend my evenings icing and massaging to try and get the blood to flow from my foot so at bed time I wouldn’t have to spend hours trying to get comfortable. It seriously felt like I had restless leg syndrome. My doctor had me go to a new physical therapy source that specializes in Astym. The very first day I noticed a difference. When I got off work that night, I did NOT have Chipmunk cheeks…for the first time! No pressure…no pain!!!!!! Even the tingling from the nerves healing on the top of my foot has lessened at least 80%. I’ve had two treatments now and when I go to bed I don’t spend an hour or more moving around and turning from side to side looking for that position that I don’t feel like the sheet’s are sandpaper on my foot. I’m so grateful!!!!!!

Vermae Danielson
Momentum Physical Therapy | https://www.momentumwy.com/
Address: 305 E. Lakeway Rd., Gillette, WY 82718

Astym Therapy Got Me Back To Normal After Leg Injury!

Two years ago I broke both of the bones in my leg, right by my ankle joint. It required screws on one side and screws and a plate on the other. I was non-weight bearing for 6 weeks and in a boot for two more weeks. I lost a lot of range of motion and when I started walking I got plantar fasciitis. Astym therapy was a lifesaver! I do not have much of any scar tissue anymore and almost complete range of motion. I had too much range before; too many sprains! Literally, after she began treatment on my foot it felt better😁 Eight weeks later, I was released and I am back to running, rollerblading, and playing competitive volleyball! I would recommend it to anyone. It was amazing how quickly it worked!!!

Dixie Ailts
Momentum Physical Therapy
Gillette, Wyoming

Impairment from surgery & radiation: Astym therapy was my last hope, and it worked!

As the typical story is told, hormone positive breast cancer can return up to about 25 years. Really? Indeed. I experienced a new primary cancer 10 years after the original lumpectomy and radiation. BEWARE! As time passes after the original tissue-sparing, conservative surgery PLUS radiation —- 5 years, 10 years, 20 years —- there are more women that are falling into my same path of bilateral mastectomy. But there is a caveat to the story that surgeons rarely discuss until the second cancer presents. What about the previous radiation? What effect does that have when you remove ALL the breast tissue? What about reconstruction? What about healing and pain? The discussion about the quality of life can change significantly. Well —– previous radiation, they say, can cause a problem going forward. In my circumstance, I agree – plus 100 times over. Healing problems, dysfunction, tightness, decreased range of motion, pain, old scar tissue, new scar tissue, lymphedema with subsequent physical therapy, pain, more therapy, more problems, pain in my chest, neck, shoulder, back, headaches— more therapy, different modalities of treatment, no lasting relief, desperation. We can’t help you anymore…..

I made calls searching for more providers for yet more opinions. On arrival another practice, I told my PT that I understood if there was no more help available for me. I told her I just wanted an opinion. I just needed to turn over another stone. She proceeded to tell me about Astym therapy and the benefits, and I agreed to go forward. It was my last hope, in all honesty.

With a complex case and other scars from other surgeries, my PT continued. After many weeks of treatment and working through discomfort and dysfunction from distant and recent breast surgeries, fibrotic changes from radiation, scar tissue from other past surgeries, dysfunction from previous musculoskeletal injuries and congenital defects – I have about 90% improvement. The path has not been a straight line by any means, and work continues with ongoing exercises and manipulation to maintain function. It is difficult to put the gratitude into words….for pain relieved, for function restored, a life returned. Amen!

Katherine L. Henson
Clinic: GO Sports Therapy | 1199 S Beltline Road, #140, Coppell, TX 75019
Phone:  (972) 745-9060 | Website: http://www.gosportstherapy.com/

Astym Therapy Helped After Total Hip Replacement

Astym therapy was part of my recovery treatment and I was amazed at how quickly the old scar tissue became a thing of the past! I would highly recommend this for post surgery aftercare…

Joseph Cappuccio
Treating Clinic: Apex Physical Therapy & Rehab
110 NE 2nd Pl #106, Cape Coral, FL 33909
Phone: (239) 573-8658 | Website: www.apexptflorida.com

Top Tips on How to Play Your Best Tennis Game

Recently, we interviewed Suzie Freeman, one of the leading clinicians who keep tennis players in top shape, and got some really useful advice:

What is your experience treating tennis players?

I picked up recreational tennis in my late 40s after not playing since High School.  Tennis is a very social game, so once other players heard I was a Physical Therapist, they began to come to me with their tennis-associated injuries.  This gave me a lot of experience in treating both acutely, as well as in the rehab setting with more stubborn injuries.  As an “older” player myself, I also experienced a variety of aches and pains, which gave me firsthand experience as to what treatments really worked and what didn’t.

What are the most common injuries you see with recreational tennis players?

For the upper body, of course, lateral epicondylopathy (aka “tennis elbow”) is very common, as is shoulder pain. Rotator cuff tendinopathy can be seen in both male and female players, though a number of women can get frozen shoulders. For the lower body, I see anterior knee pain, Achilles’ tendinopathy, and plantar fasciopathy. The professional players tend to suffer from injuries related to the high forces of their games and the season’s intensity. For the recreational players, injuries often come down to poor technique or inadequate training regimens. This can be a good thing because many of these biomechanical issues can be corrected, allowing the athlete to continue to play well into their “later” years.

Do you have any tips regarding injury prevention for the recreational tennis player?

Off-court physical training can make or break a tennis player’s performance. However, it is especially critical for the recreational player who is 35 years or older. That point in life appears to be a time where our bodies seem less-forgiving to physical stresses like start-and-stop running on cement and explosive movements with our arms. Off-court training can be broken down into 3 categories: cardiovascular, strength training, and flexibility.

Cardiovascular training is always a good idea, as we all tend to lose our form as fatigue happens. Loss of form and control can definitely be a precursor to injury. One can make cardio work more tennis-specific by adding interval training:  short bursts of increased speed and/or resistance, interspersed with prolonged moderate work. I believe the “best” cardio training is whatever prolonged activity a person doesn’t mind doing. One can use any of the machines at a health club, or just take a brisk walk outdoors and try to include hills in the route.

That leaves strength training and flexibility.  Are they equally important?

Strength and flexibility are both important. However, I realize that tennis players have only so much time and motivation to perform exercise outside of the game. In my practice, I have concluded that in general, most women need to put more emphasis on strength training, and most men benefit from a focus on flexibility.

In terms of upper body injuries (especially the shoulder), I see that male recreational players often derive most of their power from their shoulders and upper arms, which can lead to over-use of the rotator cuff. If a male player is able to hit the ball utilizing proper trunk and scapular motion, this will help to unload their rotator cuff. Look up your favorite player online: how much does he rotate his trunk before he hits the ball? Is that how you look on the court? Or does your chest face the net for most of the game? Here’s a quick test for trunk mobility: Stand with your arms out sideways (shoulder height), feet apart, wider than your shoulders, but with your toes turned in. Start facing a wall so that your trunk and hips are parallel, or in-line with the wall. Now, rotate your trunk to the right as far as you can. Can you rotate far enough so that your left arm is now perpendicular to the wall? Now, try to rotate your neck to the left:  is your face directed squarely at the wall?

See the end of this interview for a series of off-court stretching exercises that address common areas of tightness. These stretches are for both male and female players.

And the ladies?

Stretching is still important for the women players. In my practice, however, I have found that women might need to put more emphasis on strength training. A number of upper body and neck injuries can arise from the poor stability of the shoulder blades. An easy way to train that would be to do plank-type exercises. With tennis, our arms are more commonly outstretched. So, I like to do planks with the elbows straight, weight-bearing on the palms vs. weight-bearing on the forearms with the elbows tucked into our sides. When performing plank exercises, it is critical to brace the abdominals, keep the shoulder blades pulled down, and maintain good cervical posture so that our chins are pulled in and back.

In terms of pre-match warming up, I believe it’s better to do your flexibility and strengthening work outside of match play. Some studies show a temporary decrease in strength after you stretch a muscle, and you certainly don’t want to go into a match with muscle fatigue from lifting weights. See below for instructions on several exercises that can be done right on the court as a pre-match warm-up. Also, please be sure to take the time to do the traditional tennis warm-up before you play. Even a 5-minute warm-up can go a long way to prevent injuries.

How has Astym treatment impacted your tennis clients?

Bringing in Astym treatment has been a huge benefit for my tennis clients.  I can now resolve many injuries that were previously considered “unresolvable”.  Also, their recovery time is cut in half – or more. On average, my “tennis elbow” clients are back on the court in 2 weeks, with competitive play at 3 weeks. I see a few players who “pop” their calf muscle. From the day of injury to back to playing full-force is two weeks. And these are middle age players.

Astym therapy also helps me find the source of the problem. Most people with tennis elbow point to the “bone” as the source of their pain. However, with Astym treatment, I can find different muscles around the elbow that are showing signs of dysfunction. For example, when it hurts lower on the epicondyle, it can often be related to not changing your grip when performing a slice. What about pain in the central part of the bone? I have seen that occur when the grip is too forceful…or sometimes it could be choice of strings. Pain more in the fleshy part of the arm? I often see that in players who strike the ball at serve with a slightly flexed elbow.

Has Astym therapy helped you as a player?

All the time. I have managed to consistently play 3-4 times per week with a stiff, arthritic shoulder.

What should injured players do if their therapist doesn’t understand tennis?

One of the great things about being a Certified Astym Provider is that you have a means of connecting with other therapists who specialize in a certain sport. In most cases, the standard Astym treatment is all most people need, but for unusual cases, outside help is available.

Check out the Astym-Certified Provider Directory on the Astym website and find a certified clinician in your area who can get you back on the court and help to keep you there! If you can’t find an Astym-Certified Provider near you, have one of your local physical therapists visit www.astym.com to sign up for certification training.

Clinician Interviewed: Suzie Freeman, MPT, OCS, Astym Cert

Post Warm-up/Work-out Tennis Stretches

For the Dynamic Stretches: take each position to a comfortable end range, pause, and then stretch the opposite side.

For the Static Stretches: hold a comfortable end-range position for 30 seconds, making sure to breathe normally.  Repeat 2-3 times on each side.

 

Lying on Back:

 

Dynamic Hip Crossover

Starting with arms out in “T” position, feet flat on the floor, and knees bent and together brace your abdominal muscles and roll both knees to the right side slowly, controlling the lowering of your legs, letting the weight of your legs pull to end range. Repeat 2-3 times on each side.

 

Dynamic Leg Overs

Starting with arms out in “T” position and legs straight on the floor, engage abdominals. Lift left leg up as high and straight as you can. Then, cross it over your body towards the floor. Contract your abdominals and return to starting position. Repeat 2-3 times on each side.

 

Lying on side:

 

Static Pretzel Stretch

Laying on your side flex hips to 90 degrees and hold the top ankle with the hand on the same side. Slightly roll pelvis inwards to prevent rounding of the lower back. Take the heel of the weight-bearing leg and place it above the kneecap of the top knee. Use that heel to push the top knee back and towards the table. You should feel a stretch in the quadriceps or the lateral thigh.

 

Static Thoracolumbar rotation stretch

Start on your side, lying with the hips stacked and flexed to 90 degrees. Rotate your trunk to face the ceiling and abduct your shoulder to 150 degrees, allowing it to rest on the floor. Stabilize your knees with the opposite hand.

 

Lying on Stomach:

 

Dynamic Scorpions

Start with arms out in “T” position and legs straight on the floor. Flex the left knee to 90 degrees and lift the leg up and over towards the opposite shoulder, not allowing the left thigh to contact the right leg. Pause and return to starting position. Repeat 2-3 times on each side.

 

Dynamic Press-ups

With your hands under your shoulders, press up one vertebral level at a time while keeping low back and buttocks relaxed. Go as far as you comfortably can, pause, then return to starting position. Repeat 2-3 times.

 

From Quadruped:

 

Modified Prayer Stretch

Sitting back onto your chest, round your back, tuck in your belly button and pull in your chin to your chest.  Allow your palms to face the ceiling. Hold this pose to feel a stretch in your lats (upper back).

 

Static Pigeon Stretch

Starting on hands and knees, lift one leg up and over the opposite ankle, sliding foot down and back.  Keep hips squared up until you feel a stretch on the outside of the hip on your bent leg.  Hold for 30 seconds to one minute, and repeat on the opposite side.

 

From a Plank:

 

Dynamic Sprinter’s Stretch

From a plank position, walk hands backward, moving into a pike position. Bend one knee to achieve a stretch through the opposite calf.  Repeat 2-3 times each side.

 

Static Deep Lunge Stretch

Walk hands forward to assume a plank position. Move one foot forward and next to hand on the same side. Pause, then return to the plank position and repeat on the opposite side. Repeat 2-3 times each side.

 

On Court Warm-Up

Tall march with knee hug

Maintain vertical posture and focus on balance. Raise up on toes as the knee is pulled to the chest.

 

Lunge steps

These can be performed with the rear leg either dropping straight to the ground (first photo) or with it stretched behind and the knee maintained in extension (second photo).

In both cases, make sure to keep your torso perpendicular to the ground. Avoid rounding your back.  

 

Lateral lunge steps

While maintaining a “sternum up” posture in the torso, weight is shifted first to the right and then the left followed by a pivot which leaves you facing the opposite direction and the shift is repeated.

 

 

Soldier march/skip

Lift right leg to outstretched left hand while maintaining an upright posture. As you warm up, increase the velocity and height of the kick, progressing up onto the toes of your standing leg. Alternate feet for 5 repetitions on each side.

 

Sprinter’s stretch

Kneel on the right knee with your left leg in front of you with your foot flat on the ground. Place hands on the floor to support yourself. Straighten left hip and knee slowly, keeping foot flat. Hold for a count of 1-2 seconds, lower, and repeat five times in a slow pumping motion. Repeat stretch with left foot turned out, and then with left foot turned in. Perform the same stretch with right leg in front.

 

Heel cord stretch/Big toe rocks

In pike position with both hands on the floor, lift one foot to the heel of opposite foot. Next, lift heel off the floor to achieve a toe extension, then slowly lower back to the floor giving pressure in a downward direction with the opposite foot from behind. Repeat 3 times to each side.

 

Spiderman

Lunge forward onto right leg, bringing the right arm to the inside of the right leg and lower hips toward the floor until you feel a stretch in the left hip flexor; pause and then reach forward with opposite leg – like Spiderman – to the same position with the opposite leg. Repeat 3 times on each side.

 

 

Twister

Starting with arms straight and to the side in a “T” position, bend forward at the hips keeping back straight similar to the setup position in golf. Keeping knees pointed straight ahead, rotate your trunk and swing arms from side-to-side, letting the weight and momentum of your arms pull you to end range. Then, slowly start to raise up to an upright position while maintaining arm swinging motion. From an upright position, continue arm swing but now bend elbows to 90 degrees. Then, slowly straighten arms to overhead position while continuing arm swing motion. Slowly lower arms through each position back to the starting position—the whole time maintaining arm swing motion.

 

Hug world/Hug self

Wrap arms around trunk by crossing them in front while in a forward bent/back straight position (similar to golf set-up position) emphasizing spreading shoulder blades apart. Then, while coming to the upright position, squeeze shoulder blades together as if hugging the world; then back to the “hug self” position, etc Repeat 3 times.

Dynamic flexibility handout provided by Performance Dynamics, Inc. Program developed from the contributions of Amy Goddard, PT, DPT, OCS, CSCS and John Zanas, PT, CSCS, PES

 

Astym Therapy Relieved My Golfer’s Elbow

I suffered from golfer’s elbow on my right side. It was hard to wash my hair and care for my children. I was very curious and skeptical about the astym treatment. To my surprise, the therapy was very effective even after two treatments; I was much better. Now, I have no problems with my elbow. Now, I’m lifting weights without difficulty.

Angela Rutledge
Treating Clinic: Physical Therapy Associates
632 S Lincoln Blvd, Hodgenville, KY 42748
Phone: (270) 358-9765 | Website: www.physicaltherapyky.com

RELIEF!!! Astym therapy was the answer for my knee pain.

I injured my knee 3 years ago due to a fall. I ended up doing a year and a half of regular physical therapy. It was ok, but I end in a surgery. After the surgery, my physical therapist, Kayla, introduced me to Astym therapy. At first I was hesitant, but after the very first treatment I felt immediate relief! My knee felt better than it had even before the injury. I feel like Astym therapy sped up my healing. Fast forward a year after my surgery and I re-injured my knee. We went straight to Astym therapy and my progress has been phenomenal! Astym  therapy has truly been a God send for me!!!

Christina Underwood
Treating Clinic: Momentum Physical Therapy 305 E Lakeway Rd
Gillette, WY 82718 Phone: 307-696-6045  Website:  www.momentumwy.com

Life After Breast Cancer Can Be Better Than Ever

After a cancer diagnosis, the brain often switches to survival. Even after successful treatment, it can be hard to move past the lingering fears and see that there is more to life than just survival. This is the experience of Gloria Harnack, a survivor of breast cancer. “I had radiation treatment 12 years ago. Then I had a lumpectomy first, but there were issues and I had the whole breast removed.”

Gloria survived breast cancer, but the treatment left her with scarring. “It was very much like ropes under my skin,” she said,  “I had no idea that my inability to reach had anything to do with the scar tissue. As a cancer survivor, you just live with it, you don’t think about fixing it.” Gloria lived with the tightness, scar tissue, and pain for twelve years before learning there might be another option. After a visit with her physician, she was recommended to Mercy Medical Center- North Iowa, for Astym treatment sessions with therapist Lauren TeBrink.

It got rid of the pain. It has just been a remarkable treatment,” Gloria said, “I wish I could tell you the difference in what I can do with that arm now, of what it felt like before. It’s not lumpy. I never dreamed that I could have better than what I had.” Gloria had lived with her symptoms for so long after treatment, and the new life available to her after Astym treatment was eye-opening. “It doesn’t matter if you get the treatment right after breast cancer, or if you wait years. What matters is you get treatment,” she said.

Lauren TeBrink is an Astym-certified therapist who treats breast cancer survivors regularly, and she has seen the special kind of trauma that breast cancer patients endure: “Women who have gone through breast cancer are a wonderful and delicate population. This type of cancer impacts their vision of themselves and sometimes can impact how they see themselves as a woman.” TeBrink observes.

Prior to becoming certified in Astym therapy TeBrink saw a great need in her patients. Women returned with range of motion trouble and tightness, and there was no ready solution. The women had survived breast cancer treatment but were left with limitations and discomfort from the treatments. “I felt strongly that I was missing something and that I had to bridge that gap. That is what led me to Astym therapy,” TeBrink said.

After getting certified in Astym therapy, she brought the treatment back to her patients and immediately saw results. “I noticed it was significantly improving scar tissue… and improving the look and feel of the scar tissue at the breast.” For Lauren and her patients, Astym therapy was a game-changer. “Since I’ve been certified in Astym therapy, I can see the difference it makes in them [the patients], I can see the happiness. They see that they can improve. Patients who didn’t think they could get better are getting better.”

Astym therapy has answered both the physical and emotional needs of her patients. “To see the hope I can provide these women is beyond impactful to me as a therapist. To tell them I can improve their range of motion, decrease their pain, help them wear a bra more comfortably, and most importantly, to help them feel more like themselves again.” TeBrink advises patients: “Don’t settle. Do not let yourself say ‘I beat cancer and that’s good enough’. If you’re suffering from limited range of motion, scar tissue, sensitivity, if you have difficulty wearing a bra or feeling comfortable, do not settle. Love yourself enough to seek something better.”

Having a special needs brother, TeBrink knows the value of finding the right treatment when you need it. It can work wonders in someone’s life. With Astym therapy, TeBrink is dramatically improving the lives of breast cancer survivors, and she is grateful for the role. As TeBrink puts it: “This shows me that this is where I should be.”

Featured Therapist: Lauren TeBrink, OTR/L, Astym cert    Occupational Therapist at Mercy Medical Center- North Iowa, Mason City, IA

 

 

Rotator cuff

I hurt myself dragging a dumpster and so did not want to have surgery again. My doctor sent me to Momentum Physical Therapy where they did Ultra sound and Astym therapy. I found it irritating and painful, but I was willing to try anything so I grit my teeth and beared it. I am having much less pain and will probably not have to have surgery. I am absolutely delighted. The people at Momentum are excellent, especially my therapists Jessie and Kayla, and the intern Hunter. I would recommend them to anyone.

Kerry Pasklivich

Treating Clinic:
Momementum Physical Therapy
Gillette, WY

http://www.momentumwy.com

Second Time Success

After having Astym therapy about 3 years ago, I was confident when a new area was causing issues and needed treatment. I am almost finished with this round and am once again satified with the results. I joke with my therapy assistant that he loves to inflict the “pain” that stops the pain! The end results are the kinks and scar tissue is worked out and I am much more comfortable in my daily activities.

Michele Orme

 

Treating Clinic:

Sportsworks Rehabilitation
Shelbyville, Indiana

http://www.majorhospital.org

Restore – Revitalize – Recover